Pole Walking in the Media

Here are a few references to Pole Walking that can be found online.

  • TV, Online & Radio Coverage

  • Websites & Blog Stories

    Pole walking clinic introduces healthy idea

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    Pole walking clinic introduces healthy idea

    The use of modified ski poles to increase the aerobic benefits of walking has gained in popularity, including classes through the Adult and Community Education program at Flagler Technical Institute…Read More

    Pole walking adds upper body workout to walking

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    Pole walking adds upper body workout to walking

    Whether it’s young people looking to get in shape or older people with a limited range of motion, pole walking is something that benefits anyone willing to give it a try…Read More

    SelfGrowth.com Turn Your Walk into a Beneficial Workout

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    SelfGrowth.com Turn Your Walk into a Beneficial Workout

    Taking a stroll on level ground at a low to moderate intensity – is still better than staying home watching television. And if you want to get more from your walk swing or pump your arms while picking up the pace just slightly – this will increase your cardio-vascular benefits. Walking up an incline while swinging or pumping your arms will increase it even more. Ultimately walking a combination of level ground & inclines at a more moderate intensity (which means you should still be able to carry on a conversation & not be out of breath) while swinging or pumping your arms will help you benefit the most…Read More

  • Newspaper Stories

    Supercharge your walking routine, Morganton News Herald

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    Supercharge your walking routine, Morganton News Herald

    Pole walking can turn a simple walk around the block into an effective, cardio workout. That’s because the arm movement you use with the pols increases your heart rate without increasing your perceived rate of exertion. So you’ll get a much better workout, and burn more calories without feeling like you’re working any harder. In fact, research suggests that 30 minutes of pole walking is equal to 50 minutes of walking without poles.

    Now, you might find this hard to believe, but you actually use less than 50 percent of your major muscles when you walk without poles but over 90 percent of your muscles when using poles. So it’s fair to say that waling with poles helps build muscle endurance. Your arms, shoulders, upper chest and back msucles go through a full range of motion, which stretches and lengthens muscles that are often tight from sitting at a computer; reading or watching television.

    Pole walking also works wonders for balance and stability. If you practice Pilates or yoga, you can get many of the same benefits in a 30 minute pole workout. These poles will give your more assistance so you’ll feel stable and balanced, which takes stress off your lower joints. This can be especially helpful if you suffer from knee or leg discomfort

    by Dr. Charles Suber
    2009 © Morganton News Herald

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    Benefits of Ski-Like Strolling
    – Osoyoos Times Newspaper

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    Benefits of Ski-Like Strolling
    – Osoyoos Times Newspaper

    People interested in learning a fresh approach to fitness turned out to a pole walking clinic at the Sonora Centre gymnasium on Saturday, Sept. 27 at 1 pm. Jana MacFarlane, a certified instructor from Keenfit, sponsored the free event in hopes of inspiring people to a healthier lifestyle.

    For those people who want to find more energy and burn more calories without a high impact style of exercise, this is an activity they should try, urges MacFarlane, who professed to once being a couch potato herself. By adding skilike poles to a simple walking routine, people can enhance their cardio workout by 20%. She goes on with the list of benefits; build upper body strength, tone the triceps, increase metabolism and thereby help with weight loss, assist in correcting posture and decrease stress to knees and backs during workouts. “In fact,” she adds,”by using poles during a walk, 30 minutes can equal a full 50 minutes of a regular walk.”

    Given the advantages of the sport also called Nordic walking by the Europeans the four people in attendance were more than willing to shed their reluctance to try something new, and enthusiastically practiced the techniques. While those included simply using a “punch and pull” technique or a longer stride with a “pendulum arm motion”, the participants decided it would take a few lessons to master the gait effectively

    by Diane Zorn
    2008 © Osoyoos Times

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  • Magazine Articles

    Nordic Pole Walking: Fit or Fad
    – Physiotherapy Practice Magazine

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    Nordic Pole Walking: Fit or Fad
    – Physiotherapy Practice Magazine

    Letty Krucz has always loved to walk, cycle and dance. But five years ago arthritis began rapidly creeping into her knees, making almost any kind of physical activity painful. “I felt like an old lady,” says the vivacious 42-year-old today, thinking back to the difficulties she had simply rising out of a chair.

    In an attempt to stay active, she tried swimming, group exercise classes and a circuit-style workout, but none was quite the right fit. When she noticed an upbeat group of women striding through her neighbourhood with Nordic walking poles, she asked her orthopaedic hip and knee surgeon for his input. “He said it would be a ‘magnificent’ exercise choice for me,” says Kurucz.

    Today, Kurucz is a Nordic walking devotee. “Every time I push off with the poles, it releases pressure on my knees,” she says. “And focusing on the coordination and technique takes my mind away from them.” Here’s another really big bonus: she’s 40 pounds lighter thanks to her once-again active lifestyle.

    But is Nordic walking just another passing fitness fad?

    According to Marja-Leena Keast, PT, Nordic walking is a great fitness activity that can be used in many patient populations. “While it appeals to elderly individuals with stability concerns or those with chronic conditions such as arthritis, it can be beneficial for any age group,” says Keast. “For instance, in Finland it is offered as an alternative training for young army trainees unable to participate in high-impact activities due to joint injury.”

    Nordic walking has also recently been investigated as a potential rehabilitation modality for conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and fibromyalgia, and for patients with post-acute coronary syndrome or congestive heart failure, explains Keast.

    “Nordic walking is great for cardio – pulmonary rehabilitation patients,” says Keast, “and it can benefit patients with orthopaedic issues such as arthritis and peripheral neuro-pathies.” However, patients with stability issues should be assessed carefully, she adds, noting that some would be better off using a walker…Read Full PDF

    2011 © Canadian Physiotherapist Association
    Walk This Way
    – Daytona Beach News Journal

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    Walk This Way
    – Daytona Beach News Journal

    So, what if you were told that by adding a pair of poles to that half-hour walk would be the same as taking a 50-minute jaunt without them – and you would burn 48% more calories?

    “It’s true,” says Chrissy Powell, a staff instructor with the Adult Education Program Flagler County. “You can feel the difference almost right away. And the added benefit is a total body workout – especially upper body.”

    Powell discovered pole walking through long-time friend Sheila Vidamour, a certified instructor for Keenfit Pole Walking.

    “I got started in pole walking about a year and a half ago in Colorado while visiting my daughter,” says Vidamour. “I had done some power-walking and weight training before, but as soon as I tried pole walking, I was completely hooked.”

    She immediately researched the Keenfit Pole Walking method and decided she had to become a certified instructor and start teaching it back home in Flagler County. She introduced Powell to the program and since last spring the pair has trained more than 200 people in pole walking at the Bell Terre Swim and Racquet Club in Palm Coast…Read Full PDF

    by Cindy Casey
    2011 © Daytona Beach News Journal
    Pole Appeal
    – Zoomermag.com

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    Pole Appeal
    – Zoomermag.com

    Using the poles reduces the impact on the knees, hips and ankles. Also, users show improved posture and improved bilateral and rhythmical movement.

    But don’t think only people with restraints on their mobility can get a workout from urban poling. One proponent of this fitness activity is Lynn Kanuka, who is best known for her bronze medal performance at the Los Angeles Olympic Games in 1984…Read Full PDF

    by Athena McKenzie
    2011 © Everything Zoomer Magazine
    Pole Power Walking
    – Active Over 50 Magazine

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    Pole Power Walking
    – Active Over 50 Magazine

    As with any hobby or sport you love, you want to share it. In our case, we decided to share it with the very active residents of The Villages Golf & Country Club in south San Jose. This gated retirement community comes with golf courses, a country club, swimming pools, tennis courts, hiking trails, stables and some of the most scenic countryside in the South Bay.

    It is a great place to walk and enjoy the outdoors just about any time of the year. Since we introduced our Pole Power Walking Clinics over nine months ago, more than 150 Village seniors have found a way to fit pole walking into their busy schedules.

    Pole walking is a time-efficient, low-impact, total body workout anyone can do. Our program and technique is derived from Nordic Walking, a sport that began in Finland in the early 1900s to keep the Olympic Ski teams in shape during the off seasons.

    In 1997, equipment advances made Nordic Walking a popular European fitness past time. In the U.S, it is a new sport and often draws snickers from spectators or snide remarks like “where’s the snow?”

    What the onlookers don’t know is pole walking is a great workout that uses all the major muscles in the body. Recent studies by the Cooper Institute, Dallas, showed that Nordic walking increased oxygen consumption and calorie burn, and can be up to 46% more efficient than normal walking.

    Walking with poles engages upper and lower body with less perceived exertion. An upright posture increases air flow to the lungs further enhancing the fitness value of the walk. The poles help with stability and balance while absorbing some of the load from lower joints so walkers with hip, knee or ankle damage can walk longer. Without pain or worry about balance and stability, pole walkers can enjoy the walk, sights and sounds of the outdoors.

    For many of the residents at the Villages, it was Pole Walking to the rescue. Edith Olson, leader and organizer of The Pole Walkers walking club, has had hip surgery on both hips…Read Full PDF

    by Rita Marcojohn
    2011 © Active Over 50 Magazine
    The Nordic Way
    – Canadian Living

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    The Nordic Way
    – Canadian Living

    Nordic walking, also known as urban poling or exerstriding, down look a lot like cross-country skiing – without the skis and snow. Not surprisingly, it started in Europe as a way for Nordic athletes to train in the off-season is now being touted as one of North America’s fastest growing fitness trends. “It’s a fun full body workout that’s good for all age groups,” says Pam Mazzuca Prebeg, an athletic therapist and personal trainer in Toronto.

    Because you’re using your upper and lower body, you’re targeting more muscles that you do when just walking – and getting a better cardio workout. Studies show that Nordic walking burns 25 to 40 per cent more calories than regular walking, while helping to improve your posture, strengthen your core and tone your arms, legs and butt. It’s also a great rehabilitation tool, especially for anyone with knee or hip issues, says Mazzuca Prebeg, because it helps relieve stress on the joints…Read Full PDF

    by Cheryl Embrett
    2010 © Inspirint Ideas for Everyday Living Magazine
    Walking with Poles
    – Exmoor Magazine

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    Walking with Poles
    – Exmoor Magazine

    Despite living right in the heart of Exmoor (God’s own walking country), I’m ashamed to say that I just don’t seem to get out on my own two legs that often. So when I saw Nordic walking lessons being offered right on my doorstep, I figured this might be just what I needed and signed up for an introductory session. My friends laughed their heads off, saying I would have to wear a bobble hat and a thick sweater with reindeer motifs, and that I’d need to talk in ze-Nordic accent. I have to admit the idea of striding round Exmoor waving poles did seem like a recipe for ridicule but I decided to give it the benefit of the doubt.

    Nordic walking developed from cross country skiing. Basically you walk using two thin but incredibly strong poles. Unlike normal hiking sticks (which you stab in front of you), Nordic walking poles should never be placed in front of you – instead you push back on the poles as you walk, rotating your shoulders and hips. The poles act as levers to give you a springy lengthened stride…Read Full PDF

    by Jane Alexander
    2007 © Exmoor Magazine
    Smart Walking Seniors!
    – Beyond 50 Magazine

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    Smart Walking Seniors!
    – Beyond 50 Magazine

    I was 42 years old and had recently transformed my overweight and out-of-shape body and lost 30 lbs (in just 6 months) by using walking poles – yet I was confused and hurt. Everyone that I had told about this “secret’ European fitness phenomenon found it interesting but wouldn’t consider it for themselves. For some reason though, they couldn’t wait to tell their Moms or Dads about it.

    It was, and still is, amazing to me how a cross-training exercise for Olympic cross-country ski athletes can be seen as an activity only for old or injured people?

    It’s surprising how many people out there let this stigma stop them from even giving walking poles a try. I’ve even had seniors over the age of 80 say, “I don’t need help walking.” Well, I an assure you, Olympic cross-country ski athletes certainly don’t either.

    Pole walking originated in the 1930s, when the cross-country ski coaches of Finland were struggling to keep their athletes in peak performance during the off season.

    Pole walking (also known as Nordic Walking) isn’t new – it’s just relatively new to North America. So it is understandable that it is still seen as a mystery to many why anyone would want to walk around with a pair of poles (resembling ski poles) in their hands, without skis strapped to their feet or snow on the ground.

    Though Pole walking is literally for everyone from the casual, average walker to the more serious, athletic walker – the people who seem to be most instantly and naturally attracted to it are 55 – 75year olds (with a large amount of happy, healthy 75 to 98 year olds as well).

    I think the reason for this is that most people in this age category already love to walk. They walk socially, for fun and for exercise, so adding poles simply makes sense. Plus once they find out that using poles makes walking more beneficial (increasing their cardio by 20 percent and calorie burn by up to 48 percent) and that it actually takes less effort to do and is easier on their bodies (lessening the impact with which they hit the ground by 26 percent – a huge bonus if you have any back, hip, knee, ankle or feet challenges) – then it’s not surprising they are excited and can’t wait to get going…Read Full PDF

    by Sheri Simson
    2008 © Beyond 50 Magazine
    Winterize Your Walk
    – Weight Watcher’s Magazine

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    Winterize Your Walk
    – Weight Watcher’s Magazine

    I used to think that walking with poles on a flat surface – known as Nordic walking – was pretty silly. After all, do you really need poles to navigate flat terrain? But that was before I tried it. After 4 days of walking with poles, I was hooked. The poles eased the stress on my knees while allowing me to engage in a challenging, invigorating full-body workout. Nordic walking has easily catapulted my walking routine to a higher level and inspired me to walk more.

    Nordic walking is a fun, easy way to ramp up your workout and boost your calorie burn. “It burns more calories than walking without poles,” says Malin Svensson, a fitness coach based in Santa Barbara, California, president of Nordic Walking USA, and author of the forthcoming “Outdoor Adventures: Nordic Walking”…Read Full PDF

    by Megan McMorris
    2008 © Weight Watcher’s Magazine
    Nordic Walking, Hot Fitness Trend #1
    – Best Health Magazine

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    Nordic Walking, Hot Fitness Trend #1
    – Best Health Magazine

    This combo of regular walking and cross-country skiing burns 25 to 40 percent more calories than regular walking alone. Using poles makes walking a total body workout, helps with posture and strengthens your abs, too. “It was skeptical, but became a total convert,” says Norris…Read Full PDF

    by Diane Hart
    2008 © Best Health Magazine

     

    Reader’s Digest
    – Best Health Magazine

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    Reader’s Digest
    – Best Health Magazine

    Explore New Frontiers in Stylish, Functional Basics…Read Full PDF

    by Ingrie Williams
    2008 © Best Health Magazine
    Nordic Walking – Fitness for Every Body
    – Fitness RX Magazine

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    Nordic Walking – Fitness for Every Body
    – Fitness RX Magazine

    Finally, a new fitness regimen that anyone, even the less-than-fit, can enjoy without hesitation or intimidation. Although the “silly factor” (i.e., walking down the street on a perfectly sunny day with two ski poles in hand) seemed to stunt the initial growth of Nordic walking when it was first promoted by several Northern European pole manufacturers in the 1990’s, this very user-friendly workout has now become an international sensation. To give you an idea of just how big Nordic walking has become, more than 10,000 instructors were certified by the International Nordic Walking Association by 2002, and current estimates of Nordic walkers in the United States range from 50,000 to several hundred thousand. (The Wall Street Journal, February 1, 2007)

    Bernd Zimmerman, founder and Master Coach of the American Nordic Walking Association (ANWA), says that Nordic walking is a cross between cross-country skiing and fitness walking, and was originally developed so that cross-country skiers could train in the off-season when there is very little snow. He believes the explosion in popularity of Nordic walking is due to several factors: you can do it year round; it works for all ages and fitness levels; it has proven to be effective for weight loss; it’s a total-body workout; it’s low-impact and joint-friendly; and it’s time-efficient and convenient. Almost sounds too good to be true, except that there is scientific research to support his claims…Read Full PDF

    by Carol Ann Weber
    2007 © Fitness RX Magazine
    Ple Position
    – Chatelaine Walking Club Magazine

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    Ple Position
    – Chatelaine Walking Club Magazine

    What’s one part walking, one part cross-country skiing and one of the hottest new ways to blast a slew of calories? It’s Nordic walking, a popular fitness activity in Europe that’s quickly gaining momentum this side of the Atlantic. The whole-body walking workout involves using two ski-like poles to propel yourself along rural roads, urban pavement and nature trails.

    Less jarring on joints than running, Nordic walking targets almost every muscle in your body: your arms, shoulders and back in particular, says Joanne Younker, a ski and Nordic walking instructor in Whistler, B.C. “I totally reshaped my upper body and gained better mobility in my spine after I started Nordic walking,” she says…Read Full PDF

    by Amanda Vogel
    2007 © Chatelaine Walking Club Magazine
    The Sport of Nordic Walking is more Popular than Ever
    – Better Homes & Gardens

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    The Sport of Nordic Walking is more Popular than Ever
    – Better Homes & Gardens

    Poles aren’t just for holding up beans – they’re now part of a fun new way to ramp up your regular walk. It’s called Nordic walking, a sport that got its foothold in Finland and is now spreading across the United States as more and more Americas embrace it for its ability to build strength, endurance, muscle tone, and bone density. Specifically designed walking poles transform a serene stroll into a while-body workout, boosting heart rate and burning calories up to 46 percent faster than walking alone, according to a study down by The Cooper Institute in Texas…Read Full PDF

    by Berit Thorkelson
    2007 © Better Homes and Gardens
    Turn Ordinary Walking into an Extraordinary Fat Blaster!
    – Woman’s World

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    Turn Ordinary Walking into an Extraordinary Fat Blaster!
    – Woman’s World

    Think about the last brisk walk you took. Now think about this: Your next walk can feel easier and burn up to 50% more calories. It’s a proven fact, says Tim Church, M.D., a top  researcher who tested trendy gadgets called walking poles at the famed Cooper institute in Dallas. invented for Finland’s Olympic skiers to use during summer workouts, the devices found their way to regular folks – and have been working fat-melting magic ever since. “Walking poles allow you to engage more muscles, and the more muscles you engage, the more calories you burn,” explains Dr. Church.

    That’s not all: “The poles take pressure off your feet, ankles, knees, hips and back,” says Wisconsin physician Stephen Dufresne, M.D., “so it feels better to walk with them than without them.” Yet the true power of walking poles didn’t hit us until we heard about Anne Marie Westenberg…Read Full PDF

    2007 © Woman’s World Magazine
    Walking Strong
    – Beyond 50 Magazine

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    Walking Strong
    – Beyond 50 Magazine

    My Dad, Norman, turned 90 years old in December. It’s amazing – at one time, he smoked three packs of cigarettes a day and sat in a truck six days a week. He drove the mail in a single-axle truck with a 35-foot trailer from Dawson Creek (Mile Zero on the Alaska Highway), up to Whitehorse, Yukon (mile 918 on the highway). It’s a three day trip each way.

    From the time he moved in to the Highlands, a senior’s home in North Glenmore, he started to walk regularly. He had some trouble with his knees and the uphill walks. When he read about the Keenfit Walking Poles in the paper, he tried them out at the Senior’s Centre in Rutland. He got his new walking poles December, 2005 for his birthday. He’s been walking nearly every day since…Read Full PDF

    by Vivian Hamanishi
    2007 © Beyond 50 Magazine
    Striding Toward Good Health
    – Alive Magazine

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    Striding Toward Good Health
    – Alive Magazine

    Walking is simple: you place one foot in front of the other in succession. It’s called locomotion. What differentiates us from other walking mammals is that we’ve found a variety of ways to benefit from this simple act.

    Using specially designed Nordic poles held in each hand to apply force with each stride uses more of the body and burns up to 40 percent more calories than normal walking. Nordic walking stimulates the chest, triceps, biceps, shoulders, abdominals, and other core muscles while applying less stress on the shins, knees, hips, and back…Read Full PDF

    by Sandi Gauvin
    2007 © Alive Magazine